• Professors Mark Hay and Danielle Dixson talk about their research in Fiji and why marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished areas recover. The research was featured on the cover of the journal Science.
  • Dr. Joel Kostka, a Professor jointly appointed in Biology and Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, was recently awarded $1.0 million in research grants by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to study the microbially-mediated carbon cycle in boreal or northern peatlands. Peatlands sequester one-third of all soil carbon and currently act as major sinks of atmospheric CO2.
  • Professor Greg Gibson Awarded a T32 Training Grant from the National Institute of General Medical Science
    Congratulations to Dr. Greg Gibson for being awarded a T32 training grant from the National Institute of General Medical Science. Titled, "Computational Biology and Predictive Health”, the grant will bridge Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Industrial Systems Engineering and Computer Science through the support of 4 graduate students each year over the five funding period. The Executive Committee for the grant includes Greg Gibson, Melissa Kemp, King Jordan and Nicoleta Serban.

Recent News

The sheer volume of cyanobacteria in the oceans makes them major players in the global carbon cycle and responsible for as much as a third of the carbon fixed. These photosynthetic microbes, which include Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, are tiny – as many as 100 million cells can be found in a single liter of water – and yet they are not the most abundant entities on Earth. That distinction goes to viruses, up to 100 million of which can be found per 1 mL of seawater.

Posted on Sep 11 2014 - 9:48am.
Posted on Sep 9 2014 - 9:15am.

Dr. Marc Weissburg Professor of Biology, along with a team of multidisciplinary investigators have been awarded $2.5 million dollar grant to develop approaches for sustainable and resilient infrastructure. A key feature of the plan is to use, and compare, ecological and engineering approaches  and principles for  increasing cycling, reducing waste, and maintaining function in the face of perturbation. The team will examine complex interactions between infrastructure (e.g. water, transportation and energy systems) that traditionally have been ignored.

Posted on Sep 8 2014 - 6:39am.

Spotlight

  • CSSB
    Center for the Study of Systems Biology
    Recognized by most experts in the field as the future of biology, Systems Biology seeks to understand how complex living systems interact with each other so that we can diagnose and treat disorders such as cancer.
  • Faculty
    ACE
    Aquatic Chemical Ecology Center
    At Georgia Tech we have organized a diverse group of ecologists, chemists, sensory biologists, engineers, and quantitative modelers, to focus on chemical cues that many organisms use for to make basic survival decisions.
  • Faculty
    CBID
    Center for Biologically Inspired Design
    CBID is an interdisciplinary center for research and development of design solutions that occur in biological processes.
  • Faculty
    CIG
    Center for Integrative Genomics
    The Center for Integrative Genomics at Georgia Tech is a virtual affiliation of researchers interested in the application of genome-wide research strategies to diverse biological themes.
  • Graduate
    ICRC
    Integrated Cancer Research Center
    The mission of the ICRC is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.
  • Faculty
    NanoMAD
    Center for NanoMAD
    Our mission is to develop new technologies for detecting, monitoring and controlling self-assembled macromolecular complexes at various levels, including their pathogenic consequences, biological roles and evolutionary origins.